The Black Line Initiative

Published on Apr 3, 2015

The Black Line Initiative sprung from Aluna the movie and aims to allow groups caring for their own environment to be in contact with the Kogi and work directly with them. What comes next is up to you. Join us for a remarkable journey.


how to access Aluna the movie (2014)

Filmed and Produced by Alan Ereira

Watch OFFICIAL Trailer

Alan Ereira YouTube

Rent or Buy ALUNA

Buy on ITunes or Amazon

following is an extract from the OFFICIAL facebook Aluna Movie

Following some recent enquiries , we think it may be helpful to post this information on our Facebook page.

Update on Netflix: ALUNA is available for online streaming in the following countries

Argentina Australia Belgium Brazil Canada Costa Rica Denmark Finland France Ireland Luxembourg Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Panama Peru Sweden UK USA

In other countries, it may be possible to view the movie using Vimeo On Demand. You can check if it is available in your region by using this weblink

Edit: More links here

We also welcome any enquiries about organising a public screening of Aluna in your home town. Please contact for more details. Thanks.

Después de algunas averiguaciones recientes , creemos que puede ser útil para publicar esta información en nuestra página de Facebook.

Actualización sobre Netflix : ALUNA está disponible para los flujos en los siguientes países

Argentina Australia Bélgica Brasil Canadá Costa Rica Dinamarca Finlandia Francia Irlanda Luxemburgo México Noruega Nueva Zelanda Panamá Perú Suecia Reino Unido EE.UU.

En otros países , puede ser posible ver la película usando Vimeo On Demand . Usted puede comprobar si está disponible en su región a través de este enlace web

Editar: Más que enlaza aquí

También damos la bienvenida cualquier consulta sobre la organización de una proyección pública de Aluna en su ciudad natal . Por favor, póngase en contacto con para más detalles. Gracias

watch film “From the Heart of the World”

ed: this extract below is by Jonathan. the full article is on his site here.

From the Heart of the World: The Elder Brothers’ Warning (Kogi message)avances

The Kogi are a true lost civilization. The Kogi and their 3 sister tribes live interdependently on the highest mountain range coming out of the ocean in the world at the coast of northern Colombia. This has been their home for millennia and they are the only surviving culture that did not get annihilated by the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores over 500 years ago. The skill to survive the harsh conditions that they encountered while fleeing to higher altitudes where they could not be reached by their enemies and their tenacity to preserve their pristine culture and way of life have been a blessing for the entire world. They were selected three-kogi-tchendukuaby the Divine Mother to be the caretakers of “The Heart of the World,” from where they work hard to keep the balance and natural order of the planet.

In 1989, for the first time ever, they allowed a non-indigenous person into their sacred environment so he could create a documentary about the urgency of change within each human being. It was becoming increasingly difficult for them to keep the Earth in harmony. The film is called From the Heart of the World: The Elder Brothers’ Warning. The Kogi do not understand our unresponsiveness to their first serious warning. They are deeply concerned that the ecological imbalance created by the “Younger Brother” cultures has reached such a critical point that the Kogi need help to keep their sacred sites protected in order to keep global balance. This is why they have decided to send a second warning through a new documentary called Aluna, the movie. They want us to know that if we do not change our ways, we will be seriously reprimanded by the Great Mother, Aluna, and her impeccable laws of homoeostasis.

See the most recent documentary on and by the Kogi, “ALUNA [2014]”.         go here for updated details for ALUNA Movie  –  the trailer and the film: buy or rent

**Note that the Kogi people do not want any visitors and can only be contacted through their chosen representatives. Please respect their wishes**

UPDATE  jan 2018:  the full film has been removed. two of the most important sections of the film can be seen here in video below.    perhaps you can find other sections. if you do, please put the link in the comments below.

i have added a third video. please read their words underneath the video on youtube.

Sierra Nevada Indians: Kogi (or Kaggaba), Arhuaco (or Ika), Wiwa, Kankuamo

to assist the kogi and other sierra indians (Arhuaco (or Ika), Wiwa, Kogi, and Kankuamo), please go to the trust which was established in collaboration with the indians themselves . . . . Tairona Heritage Trust.

Aluna the movie

source of below extract

The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta is a unique pyramid-shaped mountain on the northern tip of the Andes in northern Colombia. On its slopes live four separate but related peoples: the Arhuaco (or Ika), Wiwa, Kogi, and Kankuamo. Together they number more than 30,000.

The mountain’s peak is over 5,000m high. Rising from the shores of the Caribbean, the lower plains are clad in tropical forest, turning to open savannah and cloud forest higher up.

To the Indians, the Sierra Nevada is the heart of the world. It is surrounded by an invisible ‘black-line’ that encompasses the sacred sites of their ancestors and demarcates their territory.

Older brothers

The Sierra Indians call themselves ‘the older brothers’, and believe that they have a mystical wisdom and understanding which surpasses that of others. They refer to outsiders as ‘the younger brothers.’

A meeting amongst the lush landscape of the Sierra Nevada

A meeting amongst the lush landscape of the Sierra Nevada © Danilo Villafañe

The older brothers believe it is their responsibility to maintain the balance of the universe. When there are hurricanes, droughts, or famines around the world it is said that they are the cause of human failure to keep the world in harmony.

Balance is achieved by making offerings to the sacred sites to give back to the earth what is taken out of it.


Arhuaco man, Colombia.

Arhuaco man, Colombia. © Survival

Spiritual leaders are called Mamos. The Mamo is charged with maintaining the natural order of the world through songs, meditations and ritual offerings.

Mamo training begins at a young age and continues for around 18 years. The young male is taken high into the mountains where he is taught to meditate on the natural and spirit world.

In Western culture, the Mamo could be seen as the priest, teacher and doctor, all rolled into one.

Coca vs cocaine

Surplus seashell powder creates a thick rim around the poporo over time

Surplus seashell powder creates a thick rim around the poporo over time © Danilo VillafañeThe coca leaf plays a central role in daily life and is used in offerings and ceremonies.

Each man carries a bag of the leaves, which are chewed to create a mildly stimulating effect. When two men meet, a handful of leaves is exchanged as a sign of mutual respect.

A hollowed-out gourd called a ‘poporo’ contains crushed seashells. A stick is used to transfer the powder to the wad of coca in the mouth – the highly alkaline shells react with the coca to stimulate its active ingredients. Surplus powder is rubbed on the neck of the poporo – over time, this becomes a thick collar.

The poporo is a symbol of manhood and a mark of civilization amongst the Indians.

The poporo is a symbol of manhood and a mark of civilization amongst the Indians. © Danilo Villafañe

Coca is also grown by non-Indian settlers as the raw material for cocaine. Colombia has long been dubbed the cocaine capital of the world, and its production has had devastating consequences for the indigenous population.

The lower slopes of the Sierra have been occupied by colonists growing coca for the drug trade that funds much of the armed conflict between guerrilla groups and paramilitaries in the country’s long-running civil war.

Despite the Indians’ peaceful nature, they have frequently been caught in the crossfire between the army and illegal armed groups, and many have been killed or forced to flee from the quasi-civil war raging on their land.

Keep off our land!

'The entrance of non-Indians is prohibited', sign at an Arhuaco village

‘The entrance of non-Indians is prohibited’, sign at an Arhuaco village © Kelly Loudenberg/Arianna Lapenne

For us, grave robbing is the same as taking a mother and removing her guts, taking out her teeth and replacing them with dentures, removing an eye and replacing it with glass. Mamo Ramon Gil

The Sierra Indians are descendants of the Tairona, a great civilization whose masterful gold work and architecture draw tourists and grave robbers alike to the region.

Each tribe has adapted to the invasion of their lands in its own ways: the Kogi shunned outside invasion by fleeing higher up the Sierra. They have remained particularly averse to visits from camera-toting tourists.

The Arhuaco, whose men are distinguished by their white conical hats, organized a strong political movement to defend their rights, while the Kankuamo living on the lower foothills were almost entirely integrated into mainstream society.


Water is highly revered by the Indians and there is strong opposition to existing and planned hydroelectric dams in the region. Dams interfere with the natural water cycle of the Sierra and threaten the tribes’ crops and livestock.

Privately owned land and development projects are making it increasingly difficult for the Indians to move within their ancestral territory and make offerings to keep the world in balance.